Abattoir in Wales closed after Chernobyl disaster reopens

An abattoir in Gwynedd, Wales that was forced to close after restrictions covering sheep movements after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster has reopened.

The business, which has been in Evan Roberts’ family for one hundred years, now employs three part-time staff. Mr Roberts said the latest regulations meant a lot of updating was needed at the site in Cwm Cynfal, Trawsfynydd.

The Farmers’ Union of Wales said there was a desperate need for more local abattoirs.

“It’s taken me 10 years to do all the work and get everything together to meeting with current regulations,” Mr Roberts told BBC Radio Cymru.

“We will be able to process between 200 and 300 lambs a week. These will be local animals – and what better than Welsh lamb.”

He said that with lamb prices currently low it was better for farmers to sell the produce themselves.

“It’s up to the farmers to come to us now, although after saying that we’ve already had customers come back to us, some that even used us in the 1960s have returned.”

Gwyn Williams from the Farmers’ Union of Wales said the development was “excellent” news for an industry which had been plagued by closures over recent years.

“Abattoirs have suffered because of rising prices and bureaucracy and there are only a handful left in Wales now,” he said.

Mr Williams added that without local abattoirs farmers in north Wales have to take their sheep to Preston, Lancashire, or Llanybydder in Carmarthenshire.

“This is totally unacceptable, it just does not make sense.

“Governments say they want to cut the number of miles food has to travel, but they do nothing to help.

“They leave the market to control itself, but really it could do with political direction,” he said.

Restrictions covering sheep movements after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster were lifted from all farms in England and Wales on 1 June 2012.

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Jamie Dąbrowiecki

Founder & Owner at JDAB.co.uk
Jamie is a keen blogger and has been for a couple of years. He is a huge techie – he loves video games, technology and anything with an on/off button. He's had an interest in the Chernobyl disaster for a few years now and has watched many documentaries and is hoping to go on a tour in the near future.

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